Eben Alsberg

alsberg

Bioengineering Faculty

Dr. Eben Alsberg, Ph.D.

Profile

Eben Alsberg, Ph.D., Richard and Loan Hill Professor, is the director of the Alsberg Stem Cell & Engineered Novel Therapeutics (ASCENT) Lab, which is focused on engineering strategies to replace or regenerate damaged or diseased tissues in the body. His lab uses the complex signals that are implicated in tissue morphogenesis, repair, and homeostasis as a template for the development of innovative systems to drive functional tissue regeneration. Some areas of active investigation include engineering new biomaterials and drug delivery vehicles for functional tissue regeneration and cancer therapy, controlling stem cell fate decisions, developing technologies to control the temporal and spatial presentation of signals to regulate cell behavior, understanding the influence of mechanics on cell behavior and tissue formation, therapeutic angiogenesis, organoids and organogenesis, and studying cell-cell interactions. Alsberg has been a pioneer in the tissue engineering and biomaterials research community, with more than 125 peer-reviewed articles published since 1999,and 25 patents pended or granted. He has also received many academic honors and awards, including being elected into the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering College of Fellows, the UIC President’s Distinguished Hire award, the Ellison Medical Foundation New Scholar in Aging Award, and the Crain’s Cleveland Business 2009 Forty Under 40 Award.

Description

Our laboratory focuses on engineering functional biologic replacements to repair damaged or diseased tissues in the body. We use the complex signals that are implicated in tissue morphogenesis, repair, and homeostasis as a template for the development of innovative biomaterials for tissue regeneration. Through the precise temporal and spatial presentation of soluble bioactive factors, mechanical forces, and biomaterial physical and biochemical properties, we aspire to create microenvironments that regulate cell gene expression and new tissue formation. Some areas of active investigation include controlling stem cell differentiation, delivering bioactive factors sequentially, developing spatially patterned constructs, understanding cell-cell interactions, and determining mechanical influences on cell function.